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Cardus solution focused coaching

Solution Focused Coaching An Approach for Resolving Employee Complaints has been published in the ASQ Journal for Quality and Participation.

I wrote the article based upon a discussion I had with another solution-focused practitioner. The speaker was using the term ‘Skeleton-Key’ .. from my time reading and using solution-focused I did not feel the way the speaker used the term was helpful. Having drinks with the speaker and some friends I asked, “How can I match a skeleton key to the problem that my client has constructed?” – The answer he gave was not satisfactory. I remembered the de Shazer chart in Keys … and began to think through the business application of the key to the challenge.
From my experience with solution focused consultants many think of Skeleton-Key as a single term … without varying the key based upon the need or have their go-to question – which they feel is a skeleton key. This is not as useful or pragmatic to the clients need, our work is to cooperate and co-construct a frame for the person (team, organization) to make progress – and seeking the closest skeleton key will assist in making progress.
Abstract:

Solution-focused coaching relies on a simple philosophy and language that provides a positive and pragmatic way to coach individuals. Its process is designed to discover what works in a given situation, and its goals are quite different from more common coaching methods, emphasizing the following three areas:

  1. What’s wanted rather than what’s wrong
  2. What’s going well rather than what’s gone badly
  3. Practical progress rather than explanatory theory

This article presents a high-level overview of the solution-focused coaching process and its key components. It includes examples that are intended to clarify situations where this method can be applied successfully. CLICK to download the article